Reveal Day and Blog Hop! Art of Science Creative Challenge: Orion’s Nebula

Today is reveal day for the artists participating in the first annual Art of Science Creative Challenge first pitched here. The challenge: to create something, anything- inspired by this NASA image of the birthplace of stars… Orion’s Nebula! Check out these artists, poets, designers and Enjoy the Blog Hop!!

Today is reveal day for the artists participating in the first annual Art of Science Creative Challenge first pitched here. The challenge: to create something, anything- inspired by this NASA image of the birthplace of stars… Orion’s Nebula!

Orion Nebula-hs-2006-01-q-large_web

I finished one piece and have others in the works- a bracelet, and pendants inspired by Marina Rios’ designs (resin dryng…), so stop back by in a day or so to see more.

OrionNcklc1

For the pendant on this necklace, I used a Mayan raku lentil focal (Wonderous Strange) with subdued but shimmering gold/pink/blue hues. From a gold hand-hammered link, dangles of large raw appetite, chalcedony, and smoky quartz teardrops.  (My first headpins inspired by Fanciful Devices- headpins tutorial.. Yippee! 😉

OrionNcl7745

The color palate of this photo was hard to cover completely! At first I started with saturated colors and lots of crystals for stars. But I was drawn to the Mayan lentil (as a pod for birthing…), and wanted to keep it more organic.  For the oranges and pinks, I used some coveted enameled rounds from Andrew Thornton, along with fire agate, and light citrine. Two more colors of blue Chalcedony for the aquas.  All finished off with grey, peach, and tanzanite colored silk sari ribbons.  I’ll post the other pieces as I finish them. (the picture keeps inspiring more!)

orioncklc7759

There is a delay in blog postings (my west-coast bent and a late reminder)  😉  BUT keep checking back: the artists participating are a diverse (cool!!) group of poets, designers, jewelers,  photographers.  Some are posting after work today, from various time zones, or need more time  Check back over the next coupla’ days.

Happy Blog hopping!

Tara Linda      (You are here)

Angie Warren 

D of Wondrous Strange Designs

Andrew Thornton

Sarajo~ SJ Designs

Marina of Fanciful Devices

Art of Science Creative Challenge: Orion’s Nebula

Calling ALL: artists, painters, jewelers,writers, poets, musicians, designers….
to Make Something, Anything- inspired by this shot of
Orion’s magnificent nebula!
We will all post to our blogs and blog hop through each others creations on Reveal Day- April 18!

With so many images of this nebula hanging in my studio and circulating the web, I think it’s time to channel them into something beautiful.  So here begins a new ‘Art of Science’ challenge:

Calling ALL:

artists, photographers, jewelers, writers, poets, musicians, designers….

to Make Something, Anything- inspired by this shot of

Orion’s magnificent nebula!

We will all post to our blogs and blog hop through each others creations.

Orion Nebula-hs-2006-01-q-large_web

To join in, leave a comment to this post that you want to participate, along with your blog address. (If you don’t have a blog- no worries- I can post a photo or link to your creation here on reveal day.)

Reveal day and blog hop is April 18th. Lastly, Email me with your email address so that the night before, I can send you all the list of artists & blogs participating so you can post on reveal day for our blog hop!     taralinda22[at]gmail[dot]com

And help get the word out on your blogs, FB, Twitter, etc.!   I’m excited to drum up as many artists from all over the world for this challenge.

Thank you for joining me 😉  & Happy Creating!         Photo source: NASA/Hubble site

                                                                                                                                       

Photo Details from NASA/Hubble:

“Located 1,500 light-years away from Earth, the Orion nebula is the brightest star in the sword of the hunter constellation. The cosmic cloud is also our closest massive star-formation factory, and astronomers suspect that it contains about 1,000 young stars.

…this image from NASA’s Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes looks more like an abstract painting than a cosmic snapshot. The magnificent masterpiece shows the Orion nebula in an explosion of infrared, ultraviolet and visible-light colors. It was “painted” by hundreds of baby stars on a canvas of gas and dust, with intense ultraviolet light and strong stellar winds as brushes.

At the heart of the artwork is a set of four monstrously massive stars, collectively called the Trapezium. These behemoths are approximately 100,000 times brighter than our sun. Their community can be identified as the yellow smudge near the center of the composite.

The swirls of green were revealed by Hubble’s ultraviolet and visible-light detectors. They are hydrogen and sulfur gases heated by intense ultraviolet radiation from the Trapezium’s stars.

Wisps of red, also detected by Spitzer, indicate infrared light from illuminated clouds containing carbon-rich molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. On Earth, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are found on burnt toast and in automobile exhaust.

Additional stars in Orion are sprinkled throughout the image in a rainbow of colors. Spitzer exposed infant stars deeply embedded in a cocoon of dust and gas (orange-yellow dots). Hubble found less embedded stars (specks of green) and stars in the foreground (blue). Stellar winds from clusters of newborn stars scattered throughout the cloud etched all of the well-defined ridges and cavities.”