Moonbow and Moon Rise

Excited for Fall, slowing down to write, create, make with my hands. Meantime- check out this moonbow and moonrise.

Happy SUPER duper Giant Full Moon to everyone!!  Not sure why, but it feels like this is our kick off for Fall.  I can’t wait for the coolness, and the rain…  Feeling a need for more downtime and stillness. A need to create; more poetry, new songs and lyrics, and making things with my hands.

Meantime, check out this “Moonbow” over Molokai. Surprising how it all comes about…

PapohakuBeach1_CropBow600hNasa says ” Like a rainbow at night, a beautiful moonbow shines above the western horizon in this deserted beach scene from Molokai Island, Hawaii, USA, planet Earth. Captured last June 17 in early morning hours, the lights along the horizon are from Honolulu and cities on the island of Oahu some 30 miles away. So where was the Moon? A rainbow is produced by sunlight internally reflected in rain drops from the direction opposite the Sun back toward the observer. As the light passes from air to water and back to air again, longer wavelengths are refracted (bent) less than shorter ones resulting in the separation of colors. And so the moonbow is produced as raindrops reflect moonlight from the direction opposite the Moon. That puts the Moon directly behind the photographer, still low and rising over the eastern horizon, a few days past its full phase. ”

And here is a moon rise captured “over Mount Victoria Lookout in Wellington, New Zealand.

“with detailed planning, an industrious astrophotographer placed a camera about two kilometers away and pointed it across the lookout to where the Moon would surely soon be making its nightly debut. The above single shot sequence is unedited and shown in real time — it is not a time lapse. People on Mount Victoria Lookout can be seen in silhouette themselves admiring the dawn of Earth’s largest satellite. Seeing a moonrise yourself is not difficult: it happens every day, although only half the time at night. Each day the Moon rises about fifty minutes later than the previous day, with a full moon always rising at sunset. A good time to see a moonrise will occur at sunset on Tuesday as the Moon‘s relative closeness to Earth during a full phase — called a supermoon — will cause it to appear slightly larger and brighter than usual.”  From NASA- Photo of the day. Vid by Mark Gee.

Author: tara linda

Musician, performer, poet, jewelry maker

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